• Iran!

    Iran: Details on a Mosque. Go Now!

    Iran
    Iran is home to a unique language, culture, foods, and history. Even within the Middle East Iran is unlike any other country. Explore Iran!

  • Bangladesh!

    Bangladesh: Traditional houses. Go Now!

    Bangladesh
    This low-lying country has historic ties to India and Pakistan, but today maintains a wholly unique culture. Explore Bangladesh!

  • Albania!

    Albania: Village of Theth! Go Now!

    Albania
    Albania is unique in Europe, starting with its Muslim heritage, but expanding to include food, culture, and even its natural beauty. Explore Albania!

  • Federated States of Micronesia!

    Federated States of Micronesia: Overlooking some islands. Go Now!

    Federated States of Micronesia
    This diverse country stretches for thousands of miles and has the diversity to prove it, including the people from Chuuk, Pohnpei, and Yap among others. Begin Your Journey!

  • Latvia!

    Latvia: Art Nouveau in Riga. Go Now!

    Latvia
    Latvia is small, but has a diverse history, foods, and architecture (shown), which includes aspects from both Eastern and Western Europe. Begin Your Journey!

  • Barbados!

    Barbados: Pier on the beach. Go Now!

    Barbados
    This Caribbean island has hints of British culture, but is wholly Caribbean as well. Explore Barbados!

History of Antarctica

Antarctica's geological history is as old as time, but the island's contact with people has been relatively short lived and this history reflects that. The island was first confirmed to have been sighted in 1820 and the first person in recent history to have most likely stepped foot on the island was about a year later in February, 1821 when John Davis, an American made land there. After 1821, a few people encountered the island, but it wasn't until the 1840s that it was realized and accepted to be a "new" continent, never before discovered.

By the late 1800s sailing routes to the continent were well known and a number of people had landed on the island. Shortly after this, a race to the south pole began. The two primary contenders were Roald Amundsen, a Norwegian and Robert Scott, a Brit. The two arrived to the pole within weeks of each other, but Amundsen reached the pole first, as Scott and much of his expedition died on their return from the pole.

By the 1950s a number of countries were setting up stations on Antarctica, primarily used as research bases. The United States set up a station at the south pole, called the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in honor of the poles first two expedition leaders and this station remains in use to this day.

On December 1, 1959 the Antarctic Treaty was signed, which does a number of things, most importantly it restricts all military activity on the continent and encourages scientific research. Today there are a large number of countries with research stations on the island, some of which are permanent and others which are temporary or seasonal.

This page was last updated: February, 2012